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mender

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mender last won the day on March 20

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  1. Back when I started in autocross, updates and backdates within a chassis generation were allowed with no points. One could pick a vehicle that had been produced for a number of years and cherry-pick all the good stuff to build a car that had all factory parts but hadn't been available as that combination. Biggest fuel tank, lightest chassis, most hp, best transmission and/or diff, best suspension, hubs, rad, brakes, etc. For Champ, that list includes using the heaviest curb weight for swap calculation. More freebies for the high VPi cars with no benefit to the low VPi cars that already have surplus points and nothing to use them on.
  2. If the 3515 lb curb weight is used, your additional points are 154. Having fun doesn't depend on your points total.
  3. It's been an ongoing topic on the forum for at least two years. I personally have brought this to the attention of BoD and TAC members on more than a few occasions to an effort to prevent someone building a car using the bogus weight in the swap calculator and getting caught in a no-win situation. You have the dubious honour of being that person. Blame it on the people who should have taken five minutes and corrected a number in a table.
  4. This page tells a different story: http://www.supracarparts.com/tech_data.html Heaviest non-turbo model has a curb weight of 3515 lbs. 90% of that is 3164 lbs. Your build is why I feel that it is very important to get the VPI and swap calculator standardized. You now have a car that is either: 1. Allowed to have a 260 hp engine in a 2700 lb race weight car for 54 points. That's 10.38 lbs/hp, compared to a 2300 race weight E30 with 189 hp at 12.17 lb/hp, a 17% advantage. Or: 2. An EC car. If it's EC, you just put a lot of time and money into something that you wouldn't have built if the correct numbers had been in the tables.
  5. Wasn't sarcasm but the truth. The power brakes and power steering on the Fiero make for decent feel but low fatigue and makes the car feel light on its feet. No sore shoulders or legs, and I usually hop out after a stint. The half-spin that I did at Portland in which I got nailed was with the slow manual steering, and I changed to the quick ratio rack and power steering before the next race. I probably would have caught that slide and continued rather than letting it go and attempting to roll off the track. I didn't try to save it because of the high potential of doing a tank-slapper from being so far behind on the steering from the slow ratio. One of the more significant improvements I made to the Fiero and I recommend it highly.
  6. Just send that extra two gallons of capacity to me and we'll both be happy!
  7. Basically an old NASCAR spec for the fuel vent line. Not sure why it got added to and still remains in the rule book.
  8. What's the point adder for one of these? https://www.amazon.com/SRP-Steering-Quickener-Long-Style/dp/B007IIWHUI
  9. Be thankful you didn't get charged 40 points for adding power steering like I originally did for the Fiero. I felt it should be 10 points for non-OE component (yeah, I know, that was for suspension but...) but then was surprised when it became zero because driver comfort. The power steering rack that I swapped in place of the stock non-power Fiero rack is a 2001 WS6 quick ratio box. Low effort yet great feedback and of course much easier to catch a slide when it's only 2.2 turns lock-to-lock vs 3.0 stock. Driver comfort? You bet, and a nice performance bonus with a fresher driver at the end of a stint, not to mention knowing that one can push the car harder for the whole stint with less risk of a spin.
  10. I'm kind of surprised that there's a concern about cars that have a high speed differential but have to make more stops for fuel. That's exactly what I've been told to do with my Fiero, and the rules have been changed to encourage that concept. I have more than enough points left over to significantly increase my PWR at the expense of shorter stints but don't see any sense in going so much faster than everyone else that I would essentially be racing only the clock.
  11. I raced against a guy that brought a Hobby Stock out for a 3 hour enduro race. He lasted about an hour before he blew up.
  12. Weight is listed at 450 lbs but I haven't weighed it. And it's a Pontiac engine and was only available in the 1st Gen Firebird. Sorry, can't have it in a Camaro. And thanks, I'll contact them!
  13. Just an update, ran across a video of one of the pulls: And as an interesting aside, this engine with the mods as tested in the video (cam, carbs/intake and header) would only add 125 points to the 100 base VPi of the 6 cylinder first gen Firebird that it was available in. Just imagine, a Champ-legal car with an 8.6:1 PWR and 20% more fuel than a 200 point Fox-body Mustang ...
  14. https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1972-bmw-2002tii-32/ https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1983-datsun-280zx-turbo-8/ https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1984-ford-mustang-svo-4/ https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1997-msv-ellite/
  15. We timed everyone when practicing our "on fire"' driver exit; kill switch, pretend to pull the fire handle, drop the net, undo the belts and open the door. I was quickest at just over 10 seconds, average was 15 seconds.
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