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Bill Strong

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  2. Impound report is here. https://champcarenduranceseries.blogspot.com/2021/07/2021-nelson-ledges-post-race-impound.html
  3. Some useful links. It's always good to have some spare bents and exhaust piping in the trailer to fix issues at the track. Side-pipe hookup kits are awesome at allowing different ways of making exits or even fixing crash damage. They come in various flavors, 2.5" and 3" for some cheap money. Looks like 3" is out of stock. These are slip-fit mandrel bends with exhaust clamps, so no welding is needed. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Speedway-2-1-2-Inch-Side-Pipe-Exhaust-Hook-Up-Kit,5423.html?_br_psugg_q=exhaust+systems+and+pipes Having a couple of these combo bends is a great way of getting that "just right" bend. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Combo-Exhaust-Pipe-Mandrel-Bend-Header-Tubing-Mild-Steel-2-1-2-Inch,67444.html I am showing 2.5" exhaust, and I know that goes against every instinct to use big pipes on race cars. But the smaller pipes can also be quieter when it comes to the sound that the track is measuring. 2.5" is a good compromise when it comes to reducing back pressure and keeping sounds low. As with any racing car, it's always good to build two systems for your car, one on it,m and one in the trailer or pickup to fix damage either during the race, or after. I find buying these kits is super cheap and makes fixes easy. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Universal-Mild-Steel-Dual-Exhaust-Mandrel-Bend-Kit-2-1-2-Inch,36340.html Exhaust flange gaskets. After years of testing on the V6 MR2, I found different ways of making a very reliable flange setup for endurance racing. The most reliable setup was the Chrysler/GM style ball and socket flange. Heavy and costly, they are the most bulletproof setup I have ever used. These make great exhaust adapters where you can adapt dis-simular exhaust diameters, like make an 89db Laguna exhaust system, and when you race at Willow Springs, you can easily put your 96db exhaust on. https://www.wesdonautomotive.com/direct-flex-pipes-w-flange/ Header collector or general exhaust gaskets. I have used the supplied gaskets for headers, and for the most part, they failed almost within the first stint. Especially the Chinese manufactured "eBay/Amazon" stuff. I have successfully welded new American-made 3-bolt flanges onto my Chinese headers, and had about a 1/2" overlap on the joints, and combined with the copper gaskets made a pretty bulletproof setup. It's not perfect and doesn't take to moving around well, without some sort of flex. I also double-nut the bolts. Drilling the nuts and safety wiring them also works well. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Search?query=exhaust flange&facet=l_material_type:79 V-Band interlocking clamps. I started using these clamps a few years ago. Good ones are not cheap. But they are pretty damn reliable if you use them in conjunction with flex joints. These slip over the pipes, and always have an overlap to act as the gasket. https://www.summitracing.com/search/part-type/exhaust-clamps/clamp-style/v-band Exhaust pipe flex tubes. My experience in my cars has shown that the ball and socket is the best for my racing applications. But sometimes money and maybe the location of the needed joint does not allow the use of one of those. I found that the typical wire-wound flex is good as long as the inside is not braided wire. Those cheaper versions failed after one of two race events. Having an interlocking smooth inner section like this is much better and does last much longer. For me, it was about a season of endurance races(10 or so). Trailer tools. Of course, everyone wants to do this racing stuff on the cheap. One of the best tools to load into your toter home and 40' triple stacker trailer is a welder. It's always good to have a tool to fix those pesky exhaust leaks that can keep you from racing. Welding with a MIG welder is not that hard to learn. Can you weld dimes as you see all over the internet? Hell no. But you can easily learn to MIG weld your exhaust to easily pass sound. Of course, your buddies that hang out in welding groups on the Internet will frown upon the tool I am going to post up. You can easily spend five figures on welders, and the more pricey welders are going to probably make the job easier, and look better. But for just over $100 you can get a Flux MIG welder that can do a good job at field welding parts on your race car. Flux wire does not require a bottle of gas, can actually get better penetration, and works awesome in outdoor windy conditions. It's not a pretty weld like you see on the Internet. But it works. And remember, even if you don't know how to weld, there are 20 others in the paddock that can do it as long as there is a welder to use. It operates on 110v power. It won't weld thick stuff in one pass, but for the exhaust pipe, it does a wonderful job. Ge t some good gloves, an auto-darkening helmet, and a roll or two of flus-core wire, and some good wire brushes. All that can be had for under $200. https://www.harborfreight.com/flux-125-welder-63582.html Exhaust hangers and clamps. Those clamps that you connect the pipe up with can hang down pretty low. Racing can take you places that might be good to those low-hanging bits on your car. They can dig into the dirt, which can catch on curbing, and when that happens, that can weaken the joint, and cause the exhaust to hang, or just fall off. Keep the threads and nuts at an angle of at least 90 degrees to the ground. Your muffler with its flat face can catch stuff too when you get off-road, or even on curbing. I weld a 16-gauge steel sheet to the leading edge of the muffler to act as a ramp. This can also make the underside of your car more aerodynamic. Remember that it may be a good idea to add a ramp to the back of the muffler too. Your car may not always be moving with the nose forward.
  4. You don't see anything because I haven't posted it yet.
  5. Some useful links. It's always good to have some spare bents and exhaust piping in the trailer to fix issues at the track. Side-pipe hookup kits are awesome at allowing different ways of making exits or even fixing crash damage. They come in various flavors, 2.5" and 3" for some cheap money. Looks like 3" is out of stock. These are slip-fit mandrel bends with exhaust clamps, so no welding is needed. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Speedway-2-1-2-Inch-Side-Pipe-Exhaust-Hook-Up-Kit,5423.html?_br_psugg_q=exhaust+systems+and+pipes Having a couple of these combo bends is a great way of getting that "just right" bend. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Combo-Exhaust-Pipe-Mandrel-Bend-Header-Tubing-Mild-Steel-2-1-2-Inch,67444.html I am showing 2.5" exhaust, and I know that goes against every instinct to use big pipes on race cars. But the smaller pipes can also be quieter when it comes to the sound that the track is measuring. 2.5" is a good compromise when it comes to reducing back pressure and keeping sounds low. As with any racing car, it's always good to build two systems for your car, one on it,m and one in the trailer or pickup to fix damage either during the race, or after. I find buying these kits is super cheap and makes fixes easy. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Universal-Mild-Steel-Dual-Exhaust-Mandrel-Bend-Kit-2-1-2-Inch,36340.html Exhaust flange gaskets. After years of testing on the V6 MR2, I found different ways of making a very reliable flange setup for endurance racing. The most reliable setup was the Chrysler/GM style ball and socket flange. Heavy and costly, they are the most bulletproof setup I have ever used. These make great exhaust adapters where you can adapt dis-simular exhaust diameters, like make an 89db Laguna exhaust system, and when you race at Willow Springs, you can easily put your 96db exhaust on. https://www.wesdonautomotive.com/direct-flex-pipes-w-flange/ Header collector or general exhaust gaskets. I have used the supplied gaskets for headers, and for the most part, they failed almost within the first stint. Especially the Chinese manufactured "eBay/Amazon" stuff. I have successfully welded new American-made 3-bolt flanges onto my Chinese headers, and had about a 1/2" overlap on the joints, and combined with the copper gaskets made a pretty bulletproof setup. It's not perfect and doesn't take to moving around well, without some sort of flex. I also double-nut the bolts. Drilling the nuts and safety wiring them also works well. https://www.speedwaymotors.com/Search?query=exhaust flange&facet=l_material_type:79 V-Band interlocking clamps. I started using these clamps a few years ago. Good ones are not cheap. But they are pretty damn reliable if you use them in conjunction with flex joints. These slip over the pipes, and always have an overlap to act as the gasket. https://www.summitracing.com/search/part-type/exhaust-clamps/clamp-style/v-band Exhaust pipe flex tubes. My experience in my cars has shown that the ball and socket is the best for my racing applications. But sometimes money and maybe the location of the needed joint does not allow the use of one of those. I found that the typical wire-wound flex is good as long as the inside is not braided wire. Those cheaper versions failed after one of two race events. Having an interlocking smooth inner section like this is much better and does last much longer. For me, it was about a season of endurance races(10 or so). Trailer tools. Of course, everyone wants to do this racing stuff on the cheap. One of the best tools to load into your toter home and 40' triple stacker trailer is a welder. It's always good to have a tool to fix those pesky exhaust leaks that can keep you from racing. Welding with a MIG welder is not that hard to learn. Can you weld dimes as you see all over the internet? Hell no. But you can easily learn to MIG weld your exhaust to easily pass sound. Of course, your buddies that hang out in welding groups on the Internet will frown upon the tool I am going to post up. You can easily spend five figures on welders, and the more pricey welders are going to probably make the job easier, and look better. But for just over $100 you can get a Flux MIG welder that can do a good job at field welding parts on your race car. Flux wire does not require a bottle of gas, can actually get better penetration, and works awesome in outdoor windy conditions. It's not a pretty weld like you see on the Internet. But it works. And remember, even if you don't know how to weld, there are 20 others in the paddock that can do it as long as there is a welder to use. It operates on 110v power. It won't weld thick stuff in one pass, but for the exhaust pipe, it does a wonderful job. Get some good gloves, an auto-darkening helmet, and a roll or two of flux-core wire, and some good wire brushes. All that can be had for under $200. https://www.harborfreight.com/flux-125-welder-63582.html Exhaust hangers and clamps. Those clamps that you connect the pipe up with can hang down pretty low. Racing can take you places that might be good to those low-hanging bits on your car. They can dig into the dirt, which can catch on curbing, and when that happens, that can weaken the joint, and cause the exhaust to hang, or just fall off. Keep the threads and nuts at an angle of at least 90 degrees to the ground. Your muffler with its flat face can catch stuff too when you get off-road, or even on curbing. I weld a 16-gauge steel sheet to the leading edge of the muffler to act as a ramp. This can also make the underside of your car more aerodynamic. Remember that it may be a good idea to add a ramp to the back of the muffler too. Your car may not always be moving with the nose forward. They also work as a gusset for the muffler improving the strength. Chains. Chains work awesome at keeping your exhaust off the ground. When or if your hangers fail, these can save your expensive exhaust from rubbing in the ground, or from getting you black flagged for a dragging pipe. There is probably more, but I have to get on with other ChampCar work now.
  6. Good story. Last year we had a team that claimed we were wrong that they were not over the limit. I suggested a few things, and the team captain was not crazy about me giving him advice since I think he was a sound engineer or something like that. He kept rev'ing his BMW and yes, it was quiet. But under load it was not. I happen to be behind the car when he was impressing me with his rev'ing abilities when I noticed that not a lot of air flow was coming out of the rear facing exhaust pipe. I put my hand over the pipe and that's where we discovered his professionally installed exhaust was not fully welded. He had a massive air leak at the merge for his exhaust manifold.
  7. Sound rules have changed. We are still sorting out how the rules will work over the weekend. 89db max. That includes the sound of your exhaust, any exhaust leaks, your intake roar, tire roar, the driver screaming in delight about how great this track is, etc. You need a real muffler or two, or even three.. Glass packs are not real mufflers. If it looks like this... ... It most likely wont pass sound. I say this every year, and we have people show up with them. and guess what? They fail. If you have a turbo, and think your safe? Nope. You will fail. ChampCar Endurance Series :: Sound Limits SoundLimits (1).pdf
  8. I was there in the middle of it. I loved racing at Road Atlanta with big numbers of entries. The issue wasn't the numbers, though the public thought that, it was the number of "experienced" racers that suddenly found out we were fun to race in. They could not deal with the speed differential. The one dude (experienced licensed racer) that thought he could dive bomb another e30 into 5 that ended up taking out my car and two e30s, which was the cause for the CTJ bitch-out session over the loud speaker system. Much like the first Indy, rental sprint racers are not always the best choice of drivers.
  9. Where we post them all. ChampCar Endurance Series :: Blog
  10. I have done a lot of racing with ChampCar. Been to over 250 ChampCar races. Even have a 12 or so trophies. Don't put yourself into a position to be part of any carnage. Situational awareness. Now I know some of you are pros. So my recommendations are only my opinion based on my experiences with ChampCar. So don't focus on trapping the fastest speed to the next corner like your at your favorite HPDE. Focus on who and what is around you. And determine your next moves by those who's and things going on around you.
  11. It was really wet. Then it was really dry. Saturday: There was one protest on Saturday and it was denied. Protest report will be released by the Event Director this week. Sunday: One podium team had ten points added to the VPI, and one lap added, which did not change the outcome of the race. Impound report is here. https://champcarenduranceseries.blogspot.com/2021/07/2021-nelson-ledges-post-race-impound.html Race Results https://speedhive.mylaps.com/Events/1885445 Race pictures: Images from 90racing.com https://photos.app.goo.gl/WvfRBrkVEJ5nLdrV7 Turn13 Photos ChampCar.Live Saturday ChampCar.Live Sunday
  12. Bravo Video from our CEO and special guest board chair Tyler Pedersen. They discuss radiators and rain light rule changes for 2022. Dana talks about the online tech forms.
  13. 4-ways with weights. Can be just as fast as a gun. Course thread studs and nuts. Old school Nascar way when they banned guns.
  14. Yes. Something like $5 a bag. Just spoke with the track manager to get that data. It's raining at the track right now.
  15. Friday practice / track time. Not a CCES event. Brought to you by Kaizen Autosport special fee for ChampCar entries. https://www.motorsportreg.com/events/kaizen-autosport-track-day-at-vir-aug-6th-2021-virginia-international-raceway-771200
  16. ChampCar Endurance Series Nelson Ledges 2021 Greetings ChampCar Members, The 8+7hr Endurance Race at Nelson Ledges is approaching. First, if you have not read through the Supplemental Rules please do so here. PRINT ChampCar Weekend Waivers found here. All waivers will be turned into Laura at registration in exchange for a wristband. Please print them before you get to the track. Temporary Weekend Membership Bands can be bought at Registration for $20 for any team support. Keep in mind, anyone going over on the hot side of the pit wall must be a full ChampCar crew member or driver listed on a team roster. This is done by purchasing a $50 membership online at ChampCar.org. Minors 17 and under are free. If you are new to ChampCar, or would like a rule refresher please watch the Novice/New to ChampCar video found here. Pit Assignments can be found here. ONLINE TECH FORM: If you need to be teched for 2021 please fill out and submit your online tech form. Test & Tune Information: Friday practice will be from 9:00am till noon (1 hour lunch break), 1:00pm till 5pm. Cost is $250 per team (unlimited drivers). Payment will be at the gate. A two hour session in both am and pm. We are looking forward to a great race weekend. Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns here. Thank you for your continued support for ChampCar, Chelsey Vickery Event Director Call/Text: 812.431.7716
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