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karman1970

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karman1970 last won the day on March 28

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  1. I think reasonable members would go do some research or ask tech for a definition. Everywhere I look on the internet, "air dam" is defined as a vertical component extending from below the bumper or bottom of the bumper cover/fascia. Everywhere I found "splitter" defined, it specifically says it is a horizontal component attached to the bottom of a vertical component (air dam, bumper cover, or fascia). Neither one seems to be something with a loose or fluid definition. You are 100% right to be pissed if tech specifically looked at it in the past and OK'd it and then this year the new guy went the other way. And there are other threads that show this kind of thing has been happening with other rules since the inception of the series and it's probably not going to stop over night. Sorry you got caught out on this one.
  2. Bed cover and a spoiler definitely. You are already bastardizing a BMW, don’t half-ass it and stop at the drivetrain
  3. Yeah, but you aren’t engine swapping, plus, both of intake options came on the 305 in the 3rd gen F-body. You are dealing with platform swap stuff, not a true engine swap. What you can’t do, for example, is swap in an LS and then keep the factory 3rd gen induction system for free (if you were nuts enough to try that).
  4. To simply play devils advocate, it’s a production car they made more than 1000 of in the US and it weighs under 4200 lbs. What are the other requirements? C4 Corvettes can race with us legally in D class. How about C5s? C6s? 7s? To what prep level? I don’t disagree cars like this probably don’t belong, but where in the rules does it say they CAN’T. If nothing else, maybe this will stir up enough conversation to have the BOD consider adding a line or two the the rule book (the horror!)
  5. EC = exempt. Per the rules, as long as it meets the safety and entry requirements (production car), the boss ok’s it, and you aren’t driving like an ass, you can run pretty much whatever ya brung. Not saying I think cars like this should be racing with us, but no one is violating rules by allowing them to lap with us.
  6. Are there really THAT many people who care so strongly about this championship? It’s basically an extra class and some gimmicky point structure added to one random race to add some drama to the race results. I mean it’s nice they are trying to do something else, but who seriously gets wound up about this? Would you not race in Champcar if there wasn’t a championship? Let’s argue about important stuff like 944 swaps, MR2 values, and evil Thunderbirds.
  7. Ideal in what way? Power, thermal efficiency?
  8. Thanks for all the feedback. Been running the stock ECU until now, but I picked up a Hondata a few months ago. I think you can pretty well make it do whatever you want. Engine is going to get dyno'd and tuned at some point this summer. My question came from watching an episode of Engine Masters and then seeing basically every other reference I could find saying over-cooling is bad and will cost you power and increase engine wear. Granted, the video was on the dyno vs in a car on track, carb'd vs EFI, and seemed geared toward the quarter-mile crowd, not so much circle track or endurance. But, the upshot of it was cooler engines have higher volumetric efficiency and make more power. I stumbled across a thesis paper this weekend that said the same thing, though they were testing a normally aspirated diesel engine at constant load and speed. It showed that VE and power increase (good) with lower coolant temp, as does BSFC (bad). Additionally, the video tested intake manifold temp (iced vs heated) and it had virtually no impact on power production. What DID impact the power was fuel temp. Cold fuel and cold engine made the most power. I was wondering whether it was worth it to run cooler than normal and chase a few more ponies, or is there a wear factor associated with a cooler engine that makes it not worth it (assuming oil temp is 200+)?
  9. Could re-tuning it have solved the rich problem and made more power? With the stock ECU it's probably still in "warm-up" mode below a certain temp, wouldn't you think?
  10. Honda. I pitched the T-stat several years ago and it’s been running fine so far. Less than 200F at COTA all weekend. Why should I put one BACK in it?
  11. I’m currently researching potential radiator upgrades for our car. I ditched the thermostat a long time ago. No cooling problems on the stock motor, but we are expecting to be making more power in the near future. Is overcooling really a possibility and what are the long term side effects (assuming oil is hot)? I’ve heard the drag race crowd say “cold water and hot oil” is the way to go. Even saw a video the other day testing that theory on a dyno and it seemed to hold true. Is that just a drag racing thing or does the same apply for endurance racing? I’ve read dozens of other articles that warn of all the terrible dangers of having an engine too cool. Thanks
  12. Cheaty fiberglass hood should eat up some points
  13. Side skirts, sucker fans, and a snowmobile engine. Probably like 20 points because Champcar aero rules. Then huge fenders and some 335 rubber.
  14. 2016 says vents may be built for fuel cells only. My copies of the 2017 and 2018 rules are written like 2019, vents are their own separate subsection and make no mention of fuel cells anywhere.
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