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Brake Flare Tool


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As with anything the cheap ones work but are fidgety.  If you are just doing a few for your car then the cheap kit will do, the expensive tool is much easier and faster and worth it if you are working on several cars and will be using it often.  

Edited by Ron_e
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1 hour ago, Ron_e said:

If you are just doing a few for your car then the cheap kit will do, the expensive tool is much easier and faster and worth it if you are working on several cars and will be using it often.  

 

Hell if you're just doing a few, go to the nearest Autozone and rent theirs.

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I bought the Eastwood flare tool last year. No better way if you can get the lines off the car. Worth every penny and then some. I didn't get the 37-degree set, but I still might. Rigid makes a 37-degree that I bought and works pretty well. You may look at one of their 45-degree versions if you want something a little nicer than the parts store flare tools.

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16 minutes ago, hornerevan said:

 

Hell if you're just doing a few, go to the nearest Autozone and rent theirs.

 

Alrighty then, sorry to upset you:lol:.   Yes if there is free rental that is another option.  

 

FYI I think most common is 45 degree flare.  There is bubble (more Euro) and inverted flares (more North American).  AN fittings are 37.5 degrees.  

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Thanks for all the suggestions. I am looking for something I can purchase because I like having an excuse to buy new tools not to mention I have more cars to work on and this could be useful. Any more thoughts on brands to buy or what to avoid?

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If it pertains to hydraulic brake pressure there is no sense in buying anything but the best tool available. I lost brakes at MIS a couple years ago and it was SCARY!

And there is this article from yesterday

http://jalopnik.com/bmw-driver-survives-nightmare-crash-when-his-e30-loses-1795500447?rev=1495642667455&utm_campaign=socialflow_jalopnik_facebook&utm_source=jalopnik_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

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17 minutes ago, Kentite said:

If it pertains to hydraulic brake pressure there is no sense in buying anything but the best tool available. I lost brakes at MIS a couple years ago and it was SCARY!

And there is this article from yesterday

http://jalopnik.com/bmw-driver-survives-nightmare-crash-when-his-e30-loses-1795500447?rev=1495642667455&utm_campaign=socialflow_jalopnik_facebook&utm_source=jalopnik_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

 

What do you recommend?

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40 minutes ago, Kentite said:

If it pertains to hydraulic brake pressure there is no sense in buying anything but the best tool available. I lost brakes at MIS a couple years ago and it was SCARY!

And there is this article from yesterday

http://jalopnik.com/bmw-driver-survives-nightmare-crash-when-his-e30-loses-1795500447?rev=1495642667455&utm_campaign=socialflow_jalopnik_facebook&utm_source=jalopnik_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

 

So dude had a brake failure and crashes and your conclusion is that it was the tool's fault?  The tool used to flare the lines, not the possible tool behind the wheel - not knowing whether he did any brake work.   Poorly installed brake lines fail too regardless of the flare.  This reminds me of Bob installing the high dollar pedals to get a dual master system - and the pedal will still go to the floor on failure.  

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5 minutes ago, Ron_e said:

 

So dude had a brake failure and crashes and your conclusion is that it was the tool's fault?  The tool used to flare the lines, not the possible tool behind the wheel - not knowing whether he did any brake work.   Poorly installed brake lines fail too regardless of the flare.  This reminds me of Bob installing the high dollar pedals to get a dual master system - and the pedal will still go to the floor on failure.  

 Not saying it was the tool's fault. I only posted the article because it was just published yesterday and I feel it emphisizes what can go wrong when brakes fail. Usually it is the archer and not the arrow. I just feel that using a high quality tool regardless of the job generally produces better results. So when it comes to brakes why not eliminate as many potential issues as possible. 

Edited by Kentite
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If you want the best flares possible then use the pre-made lengths and put in U shapes to take up the extra length.  

 

Flare quality is marginally different with respect to the price of the tool.  The high dollar tools are just easier to use and are faster.  They both accomplish the job using the same operation.  The more expensive tool will do it many more times before needing replacement.  

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Another thing that hasn't come up is the material for the lines. Nickle copper lines are much easier to flare and bend than the plastic coated steel lines. They are more expensive but you can buy a whole roll on Amazon for a pretty good price.

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I own a Tires Plus (#550, junk in the trunk racing) and we do a lot of brake lines, we have a tool made by a company named Eastwood (1-800- 345-1178).  It's basically a mini press and you can even do GM bubble flares (absolute nightmare if you don't have the right flare tool). Now my mechanic no longer complains when they come in.  I found the tool on facebook, they had a video about it, and it works the first time, every time. I think I paid $190.00

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The Sykes-Pickavant flare set is similar to the Eastwood and they work very well if your working on a bench.  Its real hard to beat that Eastwood kit for the $$, the Sykes kit is 2x the cost.  If you want something for use while on the car, the Sykes Flaremaster2 works great too.   You'll probably have to have it shipped from the UK though. 

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http://www.eastwood.com/eastwood-on-car-flaring-tool-for-3-16-tubing.html

 

I run this unit for on car use.  Fits in tight places and makes very good flares every time.  Consistent and simple to use.  We needed to add a pressure activated brake light switch in line with the in car prop valve at RA last year and it was seriously a 20min deal with bleeding the brakes. Only need 2 wrenches and your good to go.  

Edited by rustylx
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20 hours ago, Ron_e said:

 

Alrighty then, sorry to upset you:lol:.   Yes if there is free rental that is another option.  

 

FYI I think most common is 45 degree flare.  There is bubble (more Euro) and inverted flares (more North American).  AN fittings are 37.5 degrees.  

 

OH I'M SUPER UPSET RIGHT NOW! Hahaha

On Tyler's E30, I'd bet that it's a bubble flare. That's how ze Germans like to do things.

 

5 hours ago, mhr650 said:

Another thing that hasn't come up is the material for the lines. Nickle copper lines are much easier to flare and bend than the plastic coated steel lines. They are more expensive but you can buy a whole roll on Amazon for a pretty good price.

 

The only trouble with the nickle copper lines is that if you mess up a bend, there's no going back, since bending it straight and then rebending it will likely work-harden it enough to brake the line (pun intended). Steel, you can get away with this a little more.

That said, it is super easy to work with as long as you don't mess up.

 

Edited by hornerevan
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32 minutes ago, hornerevan said:

The only trouble with the nickle copper lines is that if you mess up a bend, there's no going back, since bending it straight and then rebending it will likely work-harden it enough to brake the line (pun intended). Steel, you can get away with this a little more.

That said, it is super easy to work with as long as you don't mess up.

On the other end of the spectrum. I put in stainless on a car, that stuff is hard to bend, but should never need to be replaced.

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On 5/25/2017 at 6:12 AM, Crank Yankers Racing said:

Thanks for all the suggestions. I am looking for something I can purchase because I like having an excuse to buy new tools not to mention I have more cars to work on and this could be useful. Any more thoughts on brands to buy or what to avoid?

And you get married when??????? That will all change my friend :-)

 

I know that is not helpful to finding the right tool but still helpful.

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8 minutes ago, scottyk said:

More stuff to break or leak, keep it simple.  If you want more rear brake get a different caliper.  My2cents

 

Some cars need to adjust rear bias on a per driver basis.  On our team we had 140 lb and 280 lb drivers.  In the first gen RX-7 the driver sits almost on the rear wheel so the lightest and heaviest drivers had different settings, the two middle drivers used either setting.  In our Mustang the driver sits mid way between the wheels so we only have one setting for wet and one for dry.  

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