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Teachable Moment: Filling Out One's Emergency Contact Data


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My informants have passed along to me the following:

At Portland Int'l this weekend, during Another Series's event, one of the corner workers suffered a major heart attack ("major" here defined as "he was officially a corpse at one point").

 

Said victim is alive. *BUT*... when officials called the number the victim had put on his emergency-contact form, THE VICTIM'S OWN CELL PHONE RANG.

 

I do not think I need to explain to anyone here why it *might* *possibly* be counter-productive to PUT ONE'S OWN CELL PHONE NUMBER ON ONE'S EMERGENCY-CONTACT FORM. So: Don't do it.

 

Here endeth the lesson.

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In our previous team's "logbook" we had emergency contact number for every one of us in the event that they were unable to give it to us as a result of...who knows what. 

And I've made a point of making sure friends of mine on the team have my wife's number in case something ever happens to me (on-track or wherever, lol). 

 

I would suggest those teams that have renters consider the same process. We have a very comprehensive contract for renters, but we honestly have not asked them for emergency contact information. We will from this day forward. 

S. 

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I have worn a RoadID for years with my information connected to it.  I worked as a ski patroller for a few years on the west coast and it was shocking how many people didn't even know how to contact someone themselves without looking up numbers on their phone.  More than once I loaded a patient into a helo without being able to notify anyone down in the city that their loved one is being flown to a hospital (and one of them was even an employee of the resort).  

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  • Technical Advisory Committee
5 hours ago, Huggy said:

If you have an iPhone, put it in the "health" app, and we can access it in an emergency...

Never looked at that before.... Great tip Huggy. Thanks

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  • 2 weeks later...
26 minutes ago, ABR-Glen said:

It's a good idea, but if your phone is locked, then your contacts aren't accessible.

 

I have never locked my phone, so that's not a problem... I'm using a Android too.  Did the same thing, even back in the flip phone days...

Edited by Justin9
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3 minutes ago, Justin9 said:

 

I have never locked my phone, so that's not a problem... I'm using a Android too.  Did the same thing, even back in the flip phone days...

Yeah, I think the ICE thing got started before phones could be locked. Less useful these days, but still a good idea.

I assume Huggy's comment about the iphone Health app is that it can be accessed without unlocking the phone. 

Edited by ABR-Glen
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  • Technical Advisory Committee
50 minutes ago, ABR-Glen said:

Yeah, I think the ICE thing got started before phones could be locked. Less useful these days, but still a good idea.

I assume Huggy's comment about the iphone Health app is that it can be accessed without unlocking the phone. 

Yep,

 

im still on IOS:stoneage, but I assume they havent changed it.

 

hit "emergency" then "medical id" and it will link to your contacts, and give any info you have provided in the health app.   Does pretty good at supplying the A, M, P from SAMPLE.

 

 

Yep, still works per apple

https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT207021

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Just a bit of an update to the original post. Not that it changes the validity of needing to make your emergency contact information readily available and accurate.

The medical emergency was for a driver who had a heart attack while on track.  He is 47 years old.

He was able to roll to a stop within running distance of a turn station, but was unresponsive by the time the corner worker reached his car. 

One of the team members in the safety truck that first responded was a midget.  When he arrived, the driver had no pulse and he was able to stand in the driver's lap in the car giving him compressions until the ambulance arrived. (Yes, there was one at the track) They believed this ultimately saved his life.

They were able to revive him and while he has had a tough go of it the last couple weeks, I believe he will be coming home this week. He owns a Mac Tool distributorship I believe so he is self employed and obviously unable to work now. 

There is a fundraising site to help the driver and his family at https://www.youcaring.com/abesandradouglas-996808

They believe dehydration may have been a contributing factor to this. I do not know if this driver had a cool suit, but most of us do, so it wouldn't surprise me if he did.

 

So, a few other things that can be learned from this.

1. Hydrate well for several days leading up to the race.  Don't just do it at the race.  This is an endurance sport and should be treated as such. You wouldn't know it to look at me, but I've done triathlons and I was as wiped out after my first 1:45 drive session as I was after a triathlon. I don't like all the sugar that comes in sports drinks so I got some multi-mineral tablets from my Chiropractor to keep my electrolytes up.

2. Have fluids in the car with you. I have a Camelbak strapped to the cage behind my seat.

3. the ICSCC (not sure about the SCCA or NASA) require a physical every other year to have your license.  Even though Chump doesn't require it, it's probably a good idea for us as drivers to also go in and have a physical every couple of years as well.

 

Hope that helps everyone stay healthy.

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6 hours ago, lenbo211 said:

One of the team members in the safety truck that first responded was a midget.

I have met him. He is a living embodiment of the saying "it ain't the size of the dog in the fight; it's the size of the fight in the dog".

 

Agreed that hydration is huge; and a regular physical would not be a bad idea. (And I'm 43.)

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22 hours ago, FlorahDorah said:

That safety team is a fixture in west region racing. They are top-notch with a can-do attitude. 

Indeed. I was attending one of the Rose Cup weekends; some poor blighter in an EP had an engine fire. Later, I was able to mention how quickly they'd gotten to it; I learned they had not even waited for the call to come down, but rolled as soon as they saw smoke. "Better to ask forgiveness...." :)

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