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Roll cage back stays - BCCR 3.2.4 questions


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Already sent an email to Phil/tech, but trying to get my ducks in a row sooner than the day it goes on the trailer....

 

Car was built in 2012 from my understanding, and going through the car with the rulebook and the tape measure, I think we're pretty good cage wise till I get to the rear hatch...

 

20180530_195920.thumb.jpg.95d3db4b01c4b62f4f2e4df040b887a3.jpg

 

Pads land on the rear crash structure/frame rails, and the tubes line up with the back of the fuel tank underneath, so not worried there, but the tubes have a bend, and 3.2.4 states they need to be straight.

 

I'm guessing this needs brought up to the current rules? Any advice on how to best do that? Figure new landing plates and send it to the shock towers? I'm guessing there's no grandfather clauses.....

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Those are very long, terminate behind the wheels (lemons rule), and have a bend.  I would cut those out and make new ones going to the shock tower with landing pads on at least 2 axis.

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Yeah cut those off.  Cleaner to grind down the old weld to about flush with tube.  More flexibility for new tube location and less PITA/ugly.

 

Little hard to tell in the pics, but top of RR shock towers likely a good place to go.

 

That main hoop looks nicely close to the roof....   you care about a couple holes in the roof for access to get complete welds?  Might be able to go down the bend instead if there is good access through window opening.  Add bracing, end up with something like this.

 

10410865_989180391095198_399887077934725

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3 hours ago, NigelStu said:

Yeah cut those off.  Cleaner to grind down the old weld to about flush with tube.  More flexibility for new tube location and less PITA/ugly.

 

Little hard to tell in the pics, but top of RR shock towers likely a good place to go.

 

That main hoop looks nicely close to the roof....   you care about a couple holes in the roof for access to get complete welds?  Might be able to go down the bend instead if there is good access through window opening.  Add bracing, end up with something like this.

 

10410865_989180391095198_399887077934725

Lots of tech inspectors don't like the tubes being ground back flush.  It can decrease wall thickness and cause a stress riser as well is what I have been told.

 

The stress riser is probably bull crap because I would think the h.a.z. would do the same anyway.

 

Ymmv.

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14 minutes ago, wvumtnbkr said:

Lots of tech inspectors don't like the tubes being ground back flush.  It can decrease wall thickness and cause a stress riser as well is what I have been told.

 

The stress riser is probably bull crap because I would think the h.a.z. would do the same anyway.

 

Ymmv.

Just curious, is there a proper way to remove the tube then that tech would approve of? Always good to have this information stored in the ole memory banks. Cut but leave a small section? I've only ever had to add tubes, never take away, but I've often wondered this. You don't see it mentioned in pro series rule books because they just go buy another chassis every year, haha.

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19 minutes ago, wvumtnbkr said:

Lots of tech inspectors don't like the tubes being ground back flush.  It can decrease wall thickness 

Hence why I said almost flush.  So wall thickness is maintained.

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On 6/1/2018 at 9:22 PM, UglyBoost91 said:

Just curious, is there a proper way to remove the tube then that tech would approve of? Always good to have this information stored in the ole memory banks. Cut but leave a small section? I've only ever had to add tubes, never take away, but I've often wondered this. You don't see it mentioned in pro series rule books because they just go buy another chassis every year, haha.

 

I think the bigger point is if you grind the tube to the point it is noticable you deserve the tongue lashing. Take your time and try to remove zero material besides weld. Use lower grit flap wheels to finish it back to perfect finish and roundness. Tech guys should and will get you for flat spots ground on the tube (where you clearly thinned it).

 

I would feel 100% comfortable removing and cleaning it up on my car. But i would do it so well it was undetectable and full wall thickness.

Edited by Black Magic
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@Black Magic Yep, lots of slow going to be done still, so far I've just cut them out with the sawzall, left like 3/8". Normally I'd be pretty comfy getting it ground 80% back and not taking anything extra, just a bit daunting when it's in such tight quarters. Wish my air compressor did a better job keeping up with my die grinder...

20180607_202616.jpg

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44 minutes ago, Wittenauer Racing said:

@Black Magic Yep, lots of slow going to be done still, so far I've just cut them out with the sawzall, left like 3/8". Normally I'd be pretty comfy getting it ground 80% back and not taking anything extra, just a bit daunting when it's in such tight quarters. Wish my air compressor did a better job keeping up with my die grinder...

 

 

My local Princess Auto (Harbour Freight equivalent in Canada) was blowing out refurbished 6 gallon air compressors for $100.  I linked my original 8 gallon with the new 6 gallon and it keeps up with my die grinder now.

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4 hours ago, Wittenauer Racing said:

Now there's an idea!

 

Right now I have a 26 gallon 1.8hp unit from Harbor Freight, works great for most of my needs (rattle gun mainly), but more than a few minutes with any kind of air sander/die grinder and I have to start waiting on it to re-fill...

 

You just need one of these: M-Style 3-Way Quick Coupler

 

Best $10 I ever spent.  Links the two compressors then second outlet is for the long hose reel and the third outlet is where I plug in the flex coil hose for work right at the compressor.  Then you have the big compressor that stays in the garage and the handy smaller unit that you can move out of the garage if needed somewhere else.  You want to be minimum 5.5 scf for a die grinder, your 1.8 hp should be able to keep up with that. 

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I bought the Oil-less, seems like they all flow a decent amount less than their dino juice cousins :(

 

Didn't know better at the time and the darn thing keeps running! But it only moves around 4cfm at 90psi and 6cfm 40 psi, and makes a heck of a racket doing it. Will probably pick up a nicer unit sometime this summer and then slave the current one to it for the big jobs and take it to the track as needed till it dies.

 

https://www.harborfreight.com/air-tools/air-compressors/26-gal-18-hp-150-psi-oilless-air-compressor-62629.html

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Yes my 8 gallon is oil lube and does 3.8 then my new smaller unit is oilless and does another 2.4 or something like that at 90 psi. The bigger unit is upstairs now.  

Edited by Ron_e
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