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Interesting. 

 

I feel that it's a step sideways from the mainstay of NASCAR with the intent to appeal to the sportscar fans. I guess a particular style of racing can only be developed so far before the top rungs get very crowded due to the amount of talent and engineering in the series. These proposed changes only matter on a bumpy road course, so the intended redirection is plain to see.  

 

Having a field of cars running together in a group at speeds that even the top Euro series just reaches for a fraction of their typical lap and making it safe enough to do for hours at a time to me is a remarkable achievement. Unfortunate that it's been done so well that some people find it boring.

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On 12/22/2019 at 11:21 AM, mender said:

Interesting. 

 

I feel that it's a step sideways from the mainstay of NASCAR with the intent to appeal to the sportscar fans. I guess a particular style of racing can only be developed so far before the top rungs get very crowded due to the amount of talent and engineering in the series. These proposed changes only matter on a bumpy road course, so the intended redirection is plain to see.  

 

Having a field of cars running together in a group at speeds that even the top Euro series just reaches for a fraction of their typical lap and making it safe enough to do for hours at a time to me is a remarkable achievement. Unfortunate that it's been done so well that some people find it boring.

don't forget these cars still use push rod engines and weigh WAY more than the Euro cars.  I like the new look...now they need to use factory engines. Now can we get Dodge back in the mix?

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Remember, the current "look" isn't really what the final look will be. The mfg are still finalizing the body designs in the wind tunnel.  I think the car looks like its wearing a suit 2 sizes too big.  I'm expecting the car to land somewhere between the current NASCAR and an Aussie V8 supercar.  I can't get specific, but the selected parts suppliers so far are basically the whos-who of high-end motorsports manufacturers.

 

I'm a huge Aussie V8 fan and have been saying they need to follow suit for years.  I think its great and hopefully the shot of adrenaline NASCAR has needed for about a decade (or more).  I expect to see several more road races on the calendar and maybe even some dual event oval/roval weekends (at least I think they should).

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Having a vested interest and a reasonable amount of knowledge about the car, I wouldn't get your hopes up too much. This is a move to a spec single supplier car (all but the engine), designed to give the well funded (outside of nascar) and well politically connected  teams a chance to make up for their years of poor project management and engineering execution. The team with the greatest wins the last few seasons is not part of this club, and the push to do this has been from teams that won years ago and decades ago that feel left out. 

 

Think of it more as trans am going to a spec miata car. Better even, think of this as IROC racing for the 2020's. 

 

The project has a long way to become anything resembling a performance spectacle. The new car will most likely be hundreds of lbs heavier in empty weight (no ballast) without design intervention. With a narrow timeline to turn out the car (we race it next year) this will be a tough thing for nascar to pull off well. 

 

Besides the anxiety of having to just wait for a kit of parts to show up from Nascar vendors for the first car (most likely fall, several months before the first race) this will mean the termination of a thousand or more jobs in the sport. Early estimates suggest 1/3 of all the manufacturing personnel at the cup teams will be gone post car change. 

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  • Technical Advisory Committee

  Yeah fabricators are shaking in there boots as the axe is gona fall hard .

  My prediction more road corse racing they didn't just buy Sebring and Road Atlanta for looks . The Charlotte roval has more buzz than anything NASCAR has done for years and think of a cup race on the Rolex corse at Daytona ?  Yeah that would be beyond epic. 

Edited by Ray Franck
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I guess I'm just stupid, I don't know why NASACR can't just make these people use factory body panels and engines. They are losing viewership because it has become homogeneous. All new car designs are aerodynamic.  New engine designs can produce 600+hp, I'm guessing NASCAR type engine builders could make that much higher. If one make seems to be making more power, oh well, the other will need to step up. 

As for viewers wanting to see road racing? Don't hold your breath the road course don't get nearly as many as any circle track.  And no way should NASCAR make the Daytona 500 run the road course.  Maybe the late race..... 

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On 2/5/2020 at 2:42 PM, TiredBirds said:

 the road course don't get nearly as many as any circle track.

 

Not sure if this is what you mean, but as far as I know, the top race for both TV viewers and attendance in Cup for the last few years has been WGI.  And I think followed by Sonoma.  I'm with Ray, you will likely see more road course/roval events being added to the series.  Without having track specific cars, I think you could even see an oval and roval run in the same weekend.  I don't know if that's going to be 100% the case, but I do know that some systems on the current car that do have track type specific components do not for 2021.  There is not an array of options any more (which drove costs up).

 

People I know have said its very similar to the Aussie car underneath (I believe all the OEs are still finalizing the bodies in the wind tunnel).  That is a spec chassis and some of the best racing on the planet, IMO anyway. As long as they look different and are powered differently, I think people will warm up to it.  The cars will be much easier to drive at the limit and hopefully that will lead to some very close and competitive racing.  One of the things that has bothered me about watching cup races is that it looks like their all racing 50s pickup trucks (because, thats kinda what they are).  They constantly have to saw at the wheel to get the car to turn, they bounce around like crazy and it just looks off to me.  Certainly doesn't look like what you would expect of a top spec racing series in 2020.  IMO, this is all way over due.

 

I also hope it will allow the formation of new teams and close the gap between the Penskes and the Levines of the series.  Sorry to the multicar teams that have thrown cubic dollars into development and manufacturing over the last decade, but that was a big part of the problem.  I don't think it was all backmarker driven either, I think many of the top teams welcomed efforts to reduce costs since sponsorships are getting harder to find.

 

It is definitely unfortunate that a lot of people will likely be looking for work, but a necessary evil if NASCAR wants teams to reign in costs.  I guess a silver lining is that unemployment is low and technical jobs are in demand.  But also worthy of note that a lot of people lose their jobs at teams after every season.  Silly season isn't just for drivers.

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