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Seam welding?


turbogrill
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Hi,

 

What about seam welding? Does it make a noticeable difference in stiffness?

 

Seems like a lot of work.

 

From a safety perspective wouldn't the cage be the #1 priority? Instead of spending money on seam welding you would use those resources on something else (like extra firesystem, really good cage, etc)

 

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Really depends on type of car you have before I would recommend seam/stitch welding. We are talking about stitch welding every inch it so with 1/2" to 3/4" welds, right? New need to weld the entire perimeter seam actually could cause more harm than good. Professional rally and road race unibodies cars stitch do to the extreme force exerted on the chassis by high spring and roll bar rates plus extreme tire traction loads. 

 

Certain chassis are prone to failure with extreme track use and hps. 

 

If you are having a shop do it i would stitch around the front and rear strut towers and suspension points. If you have E36 then she chassis stiffening kit is a recommended. 

 

Running coilovers it doesn't hurt to stitch but can also be supported by a good cage and mounting pads/boxes.

 

My Camaro after 8 seasons still doesn't show any need so it really depends on car. 

 

Having a well planned out cage, seat and better fire protection should always be the priority.

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18 minutes ago, enginerd said:

Was it caged? 

Rally teams don't do complete seen welds. Stitch welding is actually stronger plus it saved weight overall.

 

I would not seam weld a 911 without the car being on a fixture. I have seen 911s shrink 3/8" from welding a roll cage in so seam welding the entire chassis is just asking for trouble.

Edited by cagedruss
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49 minutes ago, cagedruss said:

Rally teams don't do complete seen welds. Stitch welding is actually stronger plus it saved weight overall.

 

I would not seam weld a 911 without the car being on a fixture. I have seen 911s shrink 3/8" from welding a roll cage in so seam welding the entire chassis is just asking for trouble.

 

I stitch welded my rally car after seeing a few too many cars with torn off subframe mounts and detached strut towers.

 

The shock loading fatigues the spot welds to the point of failure.  Focused on towers and areads between roll cage and subframe pickup points where they weren't directly tied together.

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Stitch welding is very i.portant on some cars.

 

Rx7s are known to tear out the front strut towers and separate at the firewall if not stitch welded.

 

This is of course over many years of competition.  It's not like you would notice it after 1 race.

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Best results come with using a surface plate or jig to hold all suspension and drivetrain mounting points in the proper locations.  Then removing all the seam sealer, metal prep before welding, carefully stitching the panels together in a planned order, constantly checking and monitoring the shell for any twisting, shrinking, or expanding.  Its a ton of work to get right.  Then once all that is done installed a we well planned rollcage that takes advantage of increased stiffness of the shell.  I feel adding additional well thought out bars to a good cage and stitching known areas like strut towers results in the best bang for your buck.  

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2 hours ago, Grufton said:

 

Makes me curious how this is treated in tech.  Clearly we need to be able to make repairs, but hopefully a fully stitched car will receive some points to go with it.

Just for the time to spend welding on it?  I would hope it isn't points.

 

If you want to spend the time to do it, to ahead.  Doesn't really cost anything except half a roll of wire (cost of a case of beer?)

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