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Lift Pump: Facet Dura-Lift? Or dual Facet-Cube ?


turbogrill
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Hi,

 

Has anyone tried this as a lift pump, https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/group.asp?GroupID=DURALIFT

 

It can lift several feet and rated to run dry for 4 hours. Seems like a good lift pump for a surge tank?

 

Or what about running two of these in parallel, should give some redundancy:

 

https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=82

 

If one fail you still have enough flow but the surge tank might not be full all the time.

 

Trying to figure out a way to avoid failing fuel pumps, I intend to run my lift pumps dry.

 

thanks

 

/ carl

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Carter P4594 In-Line Electric Fuel Pump

 

This is the carter pump we have used for all the years in chump/champ. Never an issue and run it dry many times. Bought it from Amazon and they are fairly

cheap.

Edited by 55mini
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Thanks! And I guess running dual carters might be a waste, more likely to screw up some plumming than having an issue?

 

At $60 it could be replaced every second year or so.

 

Mine has to be mounted above the tank, I read some where it can lift 3 ft, bottom of my tank is probably 2ft below. Should work?

Edited by turbogrill
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1 hour ago, 55mini said:

Carter P4594 In-Line Electric Fuel Pump

 

This is the carter pump we have used for all the years in chump/champ. Never an issue and run it dry many times. Bought it from Amazon and they are fairly

cheap.

That's the one I installed in 2012 and haven't had to use the spare yet. 

 

I've explained my rationale for using a higher flow lift pump a few times over the years but here goes again.

 

 Using a small pump may keep up with a steady flow but if you start getting air near the end of the stint, a small pump may not be able to refill the surge tank during the shortened time that it is getting fuel. Using a high capacity pump like the Carter with a 72 GPH rate means that it can top up the surge tank in a matter of seconds. That increases the effectiveness of the surge tank system.  

Edited by mender
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1 hour ago, turbogrill said:

Thanks! And I guess running dual carters might be a waste, more likely to screw up some plumming than having an issue?

 

At $60 it could be replaced every second year or so.

 

Mine has to be mounted above the tank, I read some where it can lift 3 ft, bottom of my tank is probably 2ft below. Should work?

No problem, the bottom of my cell is about 2 ft below as well. Buy two Carters like I did, keep one in the pit box.

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Carter it is, thanks. A little concerned about the lift capability but will try.

 

Curious, why does a pump like to be mounted below the level? So that would be under the tank.

 

The fuel pump still have to lift the fuel out of the tank, why does it matter if the pump is right on top on the tank or below? Is it because if it's below the tank it really doesn't need to create "negative pressure". 

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Ours is mounted about 12 inches above the top of the tank and has had no issue since we built our car. It even can flow rubber parts and not damage the pump, 

our pickup tube came apart from being in fuel and passed thru the pump to fill the filter with rubber. The high flow is a must.

 

As Mender said we have a spare in the parts supply as well.

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17 minutes ago, turbogrill said:

ok thanks!

 

It is connected to a hydramat, that is a filter :(

 

Curious if I can test this in my garage with  a bucket, hydramat, hose and pump (would use water). How do I simulate a vapor lock scenario?

I would test it outside with gasoline and use a switch to turn it on and off, not jumper wires. And I don't smoke. :)

Edited by mender
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  • Technical Advisory Committee

Yes, it's right above the fuel cell.

The Carter instructions say to mount the pump  "never more than 24" above the bottom of the tank."

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We are just finishing up our build and have a swirl pot but using the stock fuel pump in the tank as the feeder.  Is there any reason we'd want to put on an external lift pump instead of the in tank pump?  Other than the obvious time to fix a failed in tank pump.  Thanks!

 

 

Edited by Todd K
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27 minutes ago, Todd K said:

We are just finishing up our build and have a swirl pot but using the stock fuel pump in the tank as the feeder.  Is there any reason we'd want to put on an external lift pump instead of the in tank pump?  Other than the obvious time to fix a failed in tank pump.  Thanks!

 

 

We have a stock high pressure in tank pump feeding another in a custom swirl pot made from a stock sending unit. Send it!

 

When can I drive our car by to see yours? Pretty sure Im only 3 miles away.

 

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