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Brake ducts from fog lights - low pressure area?


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Hi,

 

We use the fog lights to route the brake ducts, would this be a bad place to route them from? 

 

According to this picture it's a low pressure area (our car is a 2006 Miata but looks similar): 

Aerodynamics

 

A 2006 Miata:

Fit For 2006 2008 Mazda Miata MX 5 MX5 Gv Front Bumper Lip Spoiler ...

 

This the "kit" we use:

image.png.b99d7162dde1be3cd56beed8d58cd1f1.png

 

I am getting a little more pad wear than I would like, curious of part of it could be overheating (either due to lack of cooling or driver).

 

Will get some paint as well.

 

 

Edited by turbogrill
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57 minutes ago, turbogrill said:

The hose is 2.5"

I would go to 3" before moving them. 4" is minimum some of the builders use on high hp stuff. 2.5" flows much less than 3"... which flows much less than 4". How well it is routed at the outlet makes a huge difference as well, but it looks like your outlet plates are tight to inner rotor surface and caliper, so probably not your problem area.

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1 hour ago, turbogrill said:

MPCBrakeRotorCoolerDetail1253766802.jpg

 

That smaller brake duct is pretty interesting, cools the friction area directly?

(Look at that massive caliper, and that massive brake duct!)

 

 

I have seen solutions all over the board, and ignorant of the actual facts here, that looks like an attempt to put some cooling at the outside edge of the rotor to decrease the delta between the cooling rate of the internal rotor area and the outside (repetitively this can be a cause of cracking/failure).

 

1 hour ago, turbogrill said:

So going larger would reduce friction loss I guess? I will still have the 2.5" outlet

 

Getting an inline blower seems interesting, https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/productdetails.asp?RecID=5751 

 

Feels like it could make piping easier. 

An upgrade to a 3" hose would include upgrading the outlet opening to 3". Blowers are certainly an option, but they generally don't move as much air as the incoming stream of a properly sized duct at speed (there is obviously a vehicle speed below which the blower moves more air).

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37 minutes ago, CBraden said:

 

I have seen solutions all over the board, and ignorant of the actual facts here, that looks like an attempt to put some cooling at the outside edge of the rotor to decrease the delta between the cooling rate of the internal rotor area and the outside (repetitively this can be a cause of cracking/failure).

 

An upgrade to a 3" hose would include upgrading the outlet opening to 3". Blowers are certainly an option, but they generally don't move as much air as the incoming stream of a properly sized duct at speed (there is obviously a vehicle speed below which the blower moves more air).

We usually only ran the fans during a yellow to augment the main brake duct (slow speed = not much passive airflow).

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We ran fans for 1 race.  Rubber clogged the fan and blew the fuse.  More rubber clogged the fan.   Brakes got hot.

 

No me gusta. 

 

Adding some type of screen may help, but can also block flow.

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On 5/7/2020 at 6:34 PM, wvumtnbkr said:

We ran fans for 1 race.  Rubber clogged the fan and blew the fuse.  More rubber clogged the fan.   Brakes got hot.

 

No me gusta. 

 

Adding some type of screen may help, but can also block flow.

If you are running fans and don't need high pressure air then you should draw air from somewhere that has cool air and is not going to pick up junk.  

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On 5/7/2020 at 4:34 PM, wvumtnbkr said:

We ran fans for 1 race.  Rubber clogged the fan and blew the fuse.  More rubber clogged the fan.   Brakes got hot.

 

No me gusta. 

 

Adding some type of screen may help, but can also block flow.

If you have the length in the duct, use two very coarse screens that are separated by about 6 inches. Big enough grid not to clog with marbles, and the second screen will usually knock the bits out of the air stream that the first screen doesn't, again without clogging.

 

Using too fine a screen for rad or brake ducts catches and holds debris.

Edited by mender
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