Jump to content

Driver Improvement - Getting up to speed quicker


Recommended Posts

Hope everyone has had a good holiday!   

While relaxing with the family I took some time to review/compare data for myself over the past couple of years. I have definitely improved over the years but I also noticed areas where I would like to improve further. Please see below and let me know your thoughts/advice!

When I reference "data" below I am speaking of speedhive data.

 

Past Focus:

A couple years back I decided to focus on improving my consistency while in traffic. I noticed that on an open track I could turn competitive times but once I got bunched up in traffic I slowed down more so than the top teams. Over the past 40-50hrs of seat time I have focused on that and have improved a great deal.  A few things that helped me accomplish this are: Sim racing, watching lots of youtube in car passing footage, reading some on planning passes and just getting more comfortable in general being close to others. 

 

New Focus:

My next issue that I identified in the data was I feel I am not getting up to speed quick enough.  Looking at the pointy end of the field most drivers appear to get up to speed within 3-6 laps. For myself it tends to take me 20-25 laps before I hit my stride. It feels like it takes that long for my mindset to get into the pace of the race. For example, over the first 2-3 laps I am a 3-4 seconds off my faster laps, then I hit a 20 lap segment where I am 1.5-2 seconds off, then something clicks and I am consistent within ~0.5 second.  I am a renter, but often drive cars I have driven before and on two day races I see the same issue both days. At races where I do multiple stints in a day, the second stint "up to speed" time is reduced to 10 laps or so.

 

Has anyone worked to improve something like this?

Any advice on getting up to speed quicker?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quite a few factors can be involved with your ramp-up to speed:

1. Familiar with car

2. Familiar with track

3. Traffic

4. Weather

 

And these are only a few, other people will have things that affect their ability to get to race pace.

 

I'm assuming that you're getting into a car that's already done a stint or two, so no warm-up of the car, just you. It sounds like you go through three stages in your personal warm-up. Can you describe what you're thinking about or worried about in each of those stages? Can you describe what your race pace driving is like, and how you feel that differs from the earlier laps? 

 

Stages:

1.  First few laps, 3-4 seconds off - what are you concentrating on doing during those laps? Car control/feel? Traffic? Line? How well the car is running?

2. Next stage: once you're settled in a bit, the next 20 laps at 1.5 to 2 seconds off - how do those laps feel, and what are you thinking about? Position in the race? Which cars are faster or slower than you? Track or weather conditions? Are you figuring out how to pass the other drivers?

3. Race pace: what are your main objectives during this phase? Consistency? How hard are you driving, 9/10ths or? How are you planning your stint? Do you experiment with line during a stint? Same pace throughout or push for the last half hour to set up the next driver?  

Edited by mender
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Given your comments about traffic, have you noticed any trends during your three stages? Does running with someone help or hinder you? How far ahead do you plan your passes, and how many corners does your typical pass take? When do you start planning your pass, as soon as you can see the next car or once you get closer?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Drive more cars.  Get better data.

 

These are the two biggest contributors for me. 

 

Many years ago I started driving multiple cars in a season, and real W2W driving, not just a few parade laps.  It forces you to learn the car which teaches you to listen to what is going on better.  Doesn't matter what it is, but you need to be in it with the ability to push for 10tenths for at least a dozen laps.

 

Get a good data system and then spend the time to compare your first laps to your teammates first.  Then look at your fast laps vrs your teammates.  Then your fast sectors.  Then look at the video.  Ignore the comments and eye rolling of your spouse.

 

Data system needs to have speed, throttle position and brake on/off at a minimum overlayed with other laps showing your location on track.  But with just those three you can learn a ton.

 

A co-driver who did a lot of sprint racing offered one item which is true - learn from each corner and apply it to the next. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, MMiskoe said:

On edit, one more thing for you would be go drive some sprint races.  If you only have 15 laps from green to checker, you won't use 20 to get up to speed.  Sprint racing at the level we do tends to have a higher intensity. 

 Running 4 lap trophy races on a banked 1/2 mile paved oval taught me to hit race pace at the green flag, especially with a reverse grid. I worked hard on the pace laps to get my tires fully to temp so I could attack the first corner and every corner after that.

 

Also, doing autocross helps me get to pace immediately. You have a very limited amount of runs to put a good time on the clock. 

 

Edited by mender
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, mender said:

I'm assuming that you're getting into a car that's already done a stint or two, so no warm-up of the car, just you. It sounds like you go through three stages in your personal warm-up. Can you describe what you're thinking about or worried about in each of those stages? Can you describe what your race pace driving is like, and how you feel that differs from the earlier laps? 

 

Stages:

1.  First few laps, 3-4 seconds off - what are you concentrating on doing during those laps? Car control/feel? Traffic? Line? How well the car is running?

2. Next stage: once you're settled in a bit, the next 20 laps at 1.5 to 2 seconds off - how do those laps feel, and what are you thinking about? Position in the race? Which cars are faster or slower than you? Track or weather conditions? Are you figuring out how to pass the other drivers?

3. Race pace: what are your main objectives during this phase? Consistency? How hard are you driving, 9/10ths or? How are you planning your stint? Do you experiment with line during a stint? Same pace throughout or push for the last half hour to set up the next driver?  

 

Appreciate the response!

Correct, most of the time I am getting into a car that is already warm (but when I start races I have the same issue). The breakdown of your stages is spot on.

My race pace driving is about 8/10ths (depending on conditions) of my skillset. I always have a concern in the back of my head I am driving someone else's car so I do not push much past that. At that level though the car is sliding around and I am comfortable with it.

 

Stages:

1. The first stage I typically have a little bit of nerves but my main focus here is car and track condition. Making sure the car and track are both as expected (brakes biting well, tires feeling good, no slick spots or track issues, no other mechanical items). I assume most go through this, and I am fine with this stage (although the way I approach it might be affecting Stage 2, so any feedback is good).

2. The second stage is hard to describe and is what I want to reduce or get rid of. I feel that I might have a slight lack of focus, and am just not really comfortable in the car.  I lean more on the side of caution than normal and do not let the car slide around like I do in the 3rd stage. Position in the race rarely plays an impact. Traffic and passing might be slower here as well. My pace into and out of turns feels slower so I typically do not take passes like I will in stage 3. I do some line experimentation here.

3. The third stage (race pace).  I am focused/comfortable and can predict the cars slides/ dives/ squirms etc. Here I am 8/10ths with occasional 9/10ths if I am chasing someone. No real "plan" for the stint unless we have some pit strategy we are working on. I typically do not do much line experimentation here, although I probably should.

 

16 minutes ago, mender said:

Given your comments about traffic, have you noticed any trends during your three stages? Does running with someone help or hinder you? How far ahead do you plan your passes, and how many corners does your typical pass take? When do you start planning your pass, as soon as you can see the next car or once you get closer?

 

I have noticed that running behind a quick car does help me a ton through the first two stages. At VIR N I got tucked behind pinkies out for a few early laps on Sunday and that expedited my process.  I typically start planning passes exiting the turn before (I am still working on looking further ahead).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

26 minutes ago, MMiskoe said:

Drive more cars.  Get better data.

 

I typically drive 2-4 different cars a year and 4-5 different tracks a year,  but the data is the hard part.  I recently got a solo 2 DL for myself, but the battery life is not long enough to get other drivers data as well (and wiring into rental cars is tough sometimes). Any other data is typically out of my control.

 

25 minutes ago, MMiskoe said:

On edit, one more thing for you would be go drive some sprint races. 

Funny you should mention that, I am hoping to start sprint racing with my own car this year. Part of the motivation for this post haha.

 

18 minutes ago, mender said:

Also, doing autocross helps me get to pace immediately. You have a very limited amount of runs to put a good time on the clock. 

 

Yep Autocross was what I did for 3-4 years after college (ES and BS mainly). Really enjoyed it but have not done it much since getting into CC. This is a good thought though, getting back into flipping that switch quickly would be useful (and its affordable).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve had the same exact issues and worked for several years now to correct them. Two things have helped greatly:
1) send a fast driver out first with a predictive lap timer. Once you get in the car there is a fast benchmark to work toward. You get IMMEDIATE feedback that you’re running slow and you have evidence that the car is capable of more than you are giving it.

2) pay close attention to the braking markers and make a written note of when you brake for each turn after you have worked up to fast laps. When you return to that track you already know how deep you can go and you don’t have to feel your way to the limit. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

First stage is prudent and typical, have to make sure the car and track are not going to surprise you, especially with someone else's car.

 

Second stage: 20 laps at 1.5-2 seconds slow = 30 to 40 seconds lost to your normal race pace. Not horrible when considering an 8 hour race but still time that you have to make up to compensate. If you're running 2 minutes per lap and 2 hours per stint, that only gives you 40 laps to get that time back, and you have to run 1 second a lap faster than your typical race pace.

 

How's your rain driving? How long do you take to get comfortable on a cold track?

Edited by mender
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, enginerd said:

1) send a fast driver out first with a predictive lap timer. 

2)  make a written note...

These are some great tips.  Much appreciated!

Being with rental teams mostly I usually just drive wherever they put me, but almost all have asked me where I wanted to drive and I just did not have a preference.  I will start requesting this in the future.

The written notes is also something I need to do more of.  I have a book for this, and have occasionally taken notes but I am not consistent about it. I am planning to be more strict on this when getting into sprint racing with my own car, that will hopefully carry over to CC as well.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, mender said:

How's your rain driving? How long do you take to get comfortable on a cold track?

My rain driving and cold track warmup both follow about the same format (3 stages) but both have a longer second stage. I do not have enough data here to see a definitive trend, but a guess looks like 28-33 laps before I hit my race pace. This might also be due to more local yellows/ cautions as well, kind of hard to get in the mindset when you only get a couple laps of green at a time (VIR-N 2022 hahah).

I am more hesitant in the rain under braking and turn-in. I find myself braking too early more often than not. Could definitely use more rain seat time. The past two HPDE's I have done in the rain got postponed until it dried :(

 

Edited by tyler_j
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, enginerd said:

I’ve had the same exact issues and worked for several years now to correct them. Two things have helped greatly:
1) send a fast driver out first with a predictive lap timer. Once you get in the car there is a fast benchmark to work toward. You get IMMEDIATE feedback that you’re running slow and you have evidence that the car is capable of more than you are giving it.

2) pay close attention to the braking markers and make a written note of when you brake for each turn after you have worked up to fast laps. When you return to that track you already know how deep you can go and you don’t have to feel your way to the limit. 

1. My main co-driver went out after I put a fast lap on the Solo and once he figured out where he was losing time, he dropped two seconds off his previous best that day.

2. I figured out a while ago that I'm an End of Braking driver (EoB) and not a Beginning of Braking driver (BoB). The difference? When asked, I can't tell you what braking marker I'm beside or close to when I start my braking but I can tell you where I switch from braking to throttle. I use that to determine if I did the corner right.

 

I use track maps to do my personal debrief, and I mark where I want to be at full throttle out of the turns. I find that to be the most important information for me. Corner entry and braking is all about getting me to the point of full throttle with the least amount of speed loss.

 

How do you drive your corners?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, tyler_j said:

My rain driving and cold track warmup both follow about the same format (3 stages) but both have a longer second stage. I do not have enough data here to see a definitive trend, but a guess looks like 28-33 laps before I hit my race pace. This might also be due to more local yellows/ cautions as well, kind of hard to get in the mindset when you only get a couple laps of green at a time (VIR-N 2022 hahah).

I am more hesitant in the rain under braking and turn-in. I find myself braking too early more often than not. Could definitely use more rain seat time. The past two HPDE's I have done in the rain got postponed until it dried :(

 

It sounds like you're sneaking up on the traction limit/sliding rather than purposefully getting the car on the edge. If you deliberately slide the car, you'll be ahead of it and not reacting to it.

 

Something to try that I like to do - carefully! Once you're into stage two, pick the slow/safe corners and deliberately overdrive them, leaving extra room with your line for the sliding that's going to take place. If that goes well, add a few more corners until you're comfortable with the car at the limit. A couple of laps like that, then do a "qualifying" lap (just below the sliding threshold everywhere so safe but fast) to establish an upper limit, then settle into your race pace.


25 laps on a 10 turn track means it's taking you about 250 corners to feel comfortable. Set a goal for yourself each time out and see what helps you reduce that corner count.  

Edited by mender
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, tyler_j said:

 I recently got a solo 2 DL for myself, but the battery life is not long enough to get other drivers data as well (and wiring into rental cars is tough sometimes).

I have a cell phone battery pack that I've been thinking about connecting my Solo to to extend the battery run time. My Solo is the first one so the data memory isn't very long but it shoud retain the fastest lap to allow comparisons during the race.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

46 minutes ago, mender said:

Once you're into stage two, pick the slow/safe corners and deliberately overdrive them, leaving extra room with your line for the sliding that's going to take place.

Thanks mender!  You are dead on with the sneaking up on it versus purposefully hitting the limit. Once I sneak up on it and find it, I can usually stay in that zone pretty consistently, getting there is just taking me longer than I would like.

 

I like this approach.  Intentionally overdriving in safe areas to find the limit quicker, then backing down from there.

 

46 minutes ago, mender said:

I have a cell phone battery pack that I've been thinking about connecting my Solo to to extend the battery run time. My Solo is the first one so the data memory isn't very long but it shoud retain the fastest lap to allow comparisons during the race.

I have a bench setup of a Milwaukee 12V 3ah battery and low voltage cutoff wired into my solo2 which theoretically would triple my run time (1500mah in the solo2). I just need to package it a little better, water proof it and do some run time tests. Overcomplicated when a simple 12v cig outlet would work but this will allow me to attach it to the cage of any car I rent, and get my own data for nearly a full 8hr race without having to rely on open power slots to keep it running. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A little late to the party but I believe driving fast can be broken into categories:

 

1. Car Control/Feel/Confidence

2. Track/Line Optimization

3. Technique

4. Racecraft/Strategy


1. Car Control/Feel/Confidence: I believe this can only be gained with experience and experience at and over the limit, which is hard to do at road racing speeds.  Every driver has a limit where they've pushed too far into a zone they've never been before, this is a scary zone, but one that is important to hit and hit often enough to learn the limits of the car.  If you start road racing, hitting the limit might mean a simple off or could mean a chassis write-off.  Autocross is a phenomenal tool to hit this limit often with little risk.  I also drove a Miata in winter and screwed around for years.  It was dumb and risky, but it taught me a lot. Only by constantly testing this limit and learning how to recover can you improve this skill in a meaningful way.

 

2.  Track/Line Optimization: There are three ways I believe you can measurably improve this.  Deliberate SIM racing, deliberate on track experimentation, and off-track reading/research and review of data.  What is important here is that your treat all your sessions, every corner, like an experiment and create a feedback loop for yourself.  Its incredibly mentally taxing, but doing this corner by corner can really help you dial in your laps for consistency and maximizing track time.  You also want to drive the track in your head, establish your prompts to create neurological connections(habits) that reduce your mental load while doing this.  

 

3.  Technique:  There are a lot of ways you can optimize your technique or tool box of techniques which you will need to optimizing the infinite variability of all aspects of every corner on every track. In GranTurismo 3, while trying to get the a gold super license in the Dodge viper at Laguna Seca I learned the importance of steering input and speed scrubbing on track out, you need to learn this to pass the level.  This was in 2004, 18 years ago and the lesson stuck with me to this day.   I also heel-toe all my down shifts, for 22 years now.  With enough experience your butt can even help you with setting up the car to maximize certain aspects of certain corners or sections.  At the end of the end of the day, I think building technique takes time and a drive/desire to learn and try new things, and when you find something that helps, you need to work on your competency in that area.  

 

4.  Racecraft/Strategy:  Understanding and using your influence on the track I believe is a unique skill.  In the end you are trying to influence a behavior or action from the car (ideally)ahead so that you can maximize your output from the lap.  If you have the right technique and car control you can take more safe chances and trust your ability to backout of you misjudged the action of car in front.  I think this is again a matter of deliberate practice, you need to drive at your limit to get better and purposely try new things to find out what works and build proficiency.   The better you can control the car and the more technical skills you gain, the easier this becomes as it opens up the number of things you can safely try. 

 

 

In the end, like most things in life, to get better you need to not only practice but deliberately iterate and try new things, once you find the next thing, you want to focus on proficiency of that thing and master it while looking for the new things.  Fundamentally the model is fueled by the learning curve, and more importantly the ability for you to quickly move up one learning curve and on to the next.   Since this is a naturally occurring phenomena this can be applied across nearly all things, I even made a graphic for our management training, this concept is applied to "products" but you can still apply it to the things you are/need to learn when driving:

7K3b7ET7LPYEIvMqanV35LyJz4ur-W-M9x-mP70PL-bfcprKOuXRBcKGGklT5SAa2BbQ1FxX5GYes1N524VIm3So8WxuPyzbupjjzlzxEEY_aWK7Yvs4sQQNQ-2BcEGOZLS9bRAo7v0Fz5Zku93-dKKAP61CDWaZSpLPkN4LtrF8qGSpv-nxu67llk0dQg

 

If you approach this deliberately by understanding first what needs to be learned then applying strategies you can really accelerate your results.

As a disclaimer this is my opinion, and although I believe I am a very good driver, there are certainly many better ones out there.  I also have a lot to learn and being a very stubborn individual my own progress has been stunted and I know there are other drivers that learned much faster than myself that might have more and better insight than my own.

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The guys that have responded are all good drivers, so I am not sure how much I could add. I realize your question is more from the view of an advanced driver but to step back for the newer drivers reading this I would say this. A race is not a good place to learn the limits of yourself or the car. Invest in track time. Learn what works and how far you can push things at a DE (or in my opinion ok but less return in auto cross). It’s all about stick time. Practice how to drive off line once you get up to speed, you will need that skill as you pass slower cars/drivers in a race.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Rodger Coan-Burningham said:

The guys that have responded are all good drivers, so I am not sure how much I could add. I realize your question is more from the view of an advanced driver but to step back for the newer drivers reading this I would say this. A race is not a good place to learn the limits of yourself or the car. Invest in track time. Learn what works and how far you can push things at a DE (or in my opinion ok but less return in auto cross). It’s all about stick time. Practice how to drive off line once you get up to speed, you will need that skill as you pass slower cars/drivers in a race.

I agree, but I think some are going to take issue with what you wrote (so I am going to add some more color).  In the early days of ChampCar (back when we went by "ChumpCar"), having a race be one's first track experience was what half of the teams were doing.  Fast forward to today, the races are WAY more competitive and the risks of jumping in with no experience are much higher.  50% of the drivers have thousands of laps, and 90% of the drivers have at least a couple of races under their belts.  Although the rules still allow a complete novice to participate, it really isn't the best idea in most situations.  The few races that get really low car counts are the exception.

Rodger mentions DE, but if you are a complete novice you might not even know what that stands for.  HPDE stands for High Performance Driving Event, and they take place at virtually every track that we run on.  You take your street car (or race car if it is built already) an get track experience.  Look up Chin Motorsports.  Look up BMWCCA or Porsche Car Club.  Some racing organizations put them on before race weekends, so check SCCA and NASA too.  Find your nearest road course's website and look at their calendar page.  You will find various organizations running track events that are HPDEs or equivalent.  At nearly all HPDEs, there is a novice class where you will be assigned an instructor (optional in some but mandatory in most) that will help you learn the basics.  They limit passing to the long straights, so you get to focus on braking and turning without having to worry about the mirror.  This lets you develop the basic skills in a low-stress environment (the complete opposite of a 80-car race).

 

If you want to accelerate your introduction to racing, SIM racing (think iRacing, not Sega) can be very effective.  However, the initial transition from the digital world to the real world is still probably best done at a HPDE.  Without lots of SIM experience, you will probably want to do multiple HPDEs before your first race.  With lots of SIM experience, one HPDE is probably fine.  ChampCar has its own SIM series that is very popular (see below)  

 

You will always be able to find someone who went straight into racing without SIM or HPDE experience, but in today's ChampCar it isn't the best way to go.

Edited by Racer28173
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Racer28173 said:

I agree, but I think some are going to take issue with what you wrote (so I am going to add some more color).


That’s ok how boring would it be if we all agreed? Yes I realize some in leadership think suggesting track time takes away from race entries but I think we have reached a point where new drivers might be more inclined to keep coming back if they aren’t overwhelmed. Dana and I have talked thru a few ways to incentivize it but we just haven’t found anything we think will work consistently. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/27/2022 at 2:18 PM, mender said:

I have a cell phone battery pack that I've been thinking about connecting my Solo to to extend the battery run time. My Solo is the first one so the data memory isn't very long but it shoud retain the fastest lap to allow comparisons during the race.

Every race car should have 12V cig sockets and USB 5V. The good ones also have 12V SAE plugs (like battery tender uses) and a baby inverter with a 110V plug.

Settings have to be right to not reset the fast lap to the session which in a race is each stint. the logger stops when the car stops.


How are you physically and mentally when you first get in the car? Wound up and tight? Are the nerves effecting perception while hurting your smoothness and car feel?

I already had good car control and confidence when I started racing, but wow did I get PUMPED before a race... I had to be ready early, then stretch, loosen up, damn near meditate and calm myself down. The mind and body work in a loop, a calm mind promotes a calm loose body, and comfortable, calm, smooth action promote a calm mind, while a tight mind or body does the opposite. Do you sweat before you even get in the car? Do you clench the wheel tighter than you need to when you're fresh in the car? I sure did. Practice broke me of this, but that took time and I had to use that bio feed back loop to my advantage.

 

Take notes after you drive, look at them before. Know your marks and HIT them. Know your track out speeds or RPM's. The more precise you are with your driving rather than goin on feel, the more repeatable it is.

Get a report from the previous driver while they're still in to know if there are any issues, what traction is like, etc. No issues? go like hell.

Push the car immediately in safe areas to test the track and conditions. Then drive to the limit you found.

 

Get one of the cars or a car on a skid pad or car control course.

Do some AutoX. Those f ers gotta go HOT right outta the gate!

These days, the best tool for the mind... it the SIM! get on there and race. Start at 80-90 percent when you're racing and focus on calm. build good habits, then turn up the volume. reassess as you go to stay focused and avoid bad habits.

Ever work with a coach? 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

All great comments, also remember as you go through a stint the fuel load will be reducing, as it drops off the cars potential will go up! I like to be with in 2-3 seconds after 2-3 laps of what my fastest lap is, though in ChampCar races often cautions and or traffic, will slow down a lap, looking beyond the corner coming up is important and chasing down the cars ahead has always helped me. Don't be surprised though to see your fastest laps at the end of a stint, weight reduction adds a noticeable amount! And by then you should be comfortable with what's going on.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/2/2023 at 10:50 AM, Wheelman_99 - C Rallo said:

How are you physically and mentally when you first get in the car? Wound up and tight? Are the nerves effecting perception while hurting your smoothness and car feel?

Push the car immediately in safe areas to test the track and conditions. Then drive to the limit you found.

 

Do some AutoX. Those f ers gotta go HOT right outta the gate!

These days, the best tool for the mind... it the SIM! 

Ever work with a coach? 

Thanks Chris!

Over the first couple of laps I have a mix of cautiousness and nerves I guess. The nerves have never been overbearing but I am definitely more calm after a few laps.

Definitely appreciate the comments/suggestions for getting up to speed quicker.  I spent 3-4 years doing "full seasons" in autoX before I had track day money.  Its definitely a different mindset!  Hoping to get out there again this summer to dodge some cones.  And agreed, SIM has done wonders for me and continues to be a big help.

 

I have not worked with a coach but it is something I have considered.  I am going to comp school this year so I can do some sprint racing. Once I get my own car race ready and have paid for the comp school I should be in a good place to look into getting some more advanced coaching. 

I think for 2023 I am going to focus on the points mentioned above and my sprint racing to improve my driving, then in 2024 potentially get a coach.  Hopefully by EOY 2023 my car will be sorted, so when I do get a coach I can 100% focus on my driving and not think twice about the car.  Unfortunately time does not allow for doing it all at once (and still doing the CC races that I want).

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/2/2023 at 7:04 PM, Timothy G. Elliott said:

also remember as you go through a stint the fuel load will be reducing

Very true!  I do see these lap improvements in my times. Typically for me the fuel aspect results in a fairly smooth trend of time reduction (after I have settled in to my race pace). 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...