Jump to content

Fire Bottle Re-Certification


Recommended Posts

Hey Champs,

 

Newbie team here, working on getting our car up to par. The fire suppression system in our car has an expired fire bottle. Wondering what the guidelines are, or how to know when a bottle is "ready for replacement" vs able to be re-certified?

 

Here are a couple of pics. Thanks for steering us in the right direction!

 

 

20180424_193836.jpeg

MSGR_PHOTO_FOR_UPLOAD_1524424984699.jpg_1524424987768.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know what the service interval is for the gasous systems (FE36, etc), but I think your SPA system is AFFF.   AFFF systems require service every 2 years, which is why service was due back in 2014.  The chemicals inside are water based and break down over time creating a waxy substance that can block lines and nozzles.  I don't know how much scrutiny tech has done on the service dates and admittedly I've gone over on ours by a year before.  We have to replace ours before the next event.

 

Additionally, at least for Lifeline, they used to life their [aluminum] bottles after 10 years and we weren't allowed to service them.  Just a heads up based on the original date of mfg.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The AFFF system that we have has the fluid completely contained in the bottle.  The bottle has a burst plate and a CO2 cartridge so the chemical will not block lines or nozzles over time.  The particular model that we have is serviced by ourselves.  It is as simple as starting with an empty bottle, dump in the concentrate, dump in the measured amount of distilled water, then put the top back on.  Invert the bottle to ensure the burst plate is sealed.  Simple as that.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Technical Advisory Committee

As of now no certification is required , soon to change, as long as the needle is in the green it will pass .  Getting it certified is the smart thing to do . I'm pretty sure a certification tag will be required next year ...  disclaimer     ,, I have been wrong before ,,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Technical Advisory Committee
1 hour ago, Ron_e said:

In that case, the only certification that we could supply is showing the CO2 cartridge that has not been ruptured.  Easy to do, just unscrew it and have a look, no different than looking at a tag.  

  Ron as you know each system is different and will have different test and certification requirements . Static test dates on the bottle and a look at the cartridge may be all your system may need . Staff are looking at a plan and standards as just having a system was just mandated a couple of years ago . 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ron_e said:

In that case, the only certification that we could supply is showing the CO2 cartridge that has not been ruptured.  Easy to do, just unscrew it and have a look, no different than looking at a tag.  

My understanding:

The cartridge deals are not SFI certified, BUT can be user serviced. So if you pop it during the weekend you can refill it and keep racing.

SFI certified bottles can not be serviced by the user, so if you wanted a backup, you'd need a second bottle.

ChampCar does not currently require certification so we can use the simpler cartridge systems. Requiring SFI would kinda suck, but I'll bet the market is drying up for the non-SFI systems so we might be forced to upgrade.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Ron_e said:

The AFFF system that we have has the fluid completely contained in the bottle.  The bottle has a burst plate and a CO2 cartridge so the chemical will not block lines or nozzles over time.  The particular model that we have is serviced by ourselves.  It is as simple as starting with an empty bottle, dump in the concentrate, dump in the measured amount of distilled water, then put the top back on.  Invert the bottle to ensure the burst plate is sealed.  Simple as that.  

 

All AFFF systems are like that, at least the ones I've serviced (Lifeline/SpA).  The main difference is that the LL and SpA have the fluid/bottle pressurized, not an external cartidge.  When the handle is pulled (or button pushed if electronic) the pressure in the bottle forces the fluid through the lines.  Having the bottle pressurized or at atmospheric doesn't change the breakdown of the AFFF fluid as far as I'm aware.  There is no fluid held in the lines of any system that I know of.

Edited by Bremsen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...