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Has anyone ever tracked your fuel temps?  We had some strange fuel tank pressure issues at VIR.  While working on the lift pump during practice i noticed the fuel was rather warm.  I'm going to start monitoring the temp @ the surge tank.  But, until i have a baseline, I'm not quite sure what to look for.

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Fuel gets really hot from radiant heat from the track surface. My cell in my car had the same issue a couple of seasons ago. I was having a vaporlock type issue and I opened up the top of the cell to check the pick up. Stuck my hand inside and I had to pull it back out. It was to hot. Just to clarify something. My exhaust didn't run next to the cell. It emptied in front of the rear tire so there was no heat transfer from the exhaust.

 

Then I remembered what we did when I was a NASCAR crew guy way back when. We added a piece of 1/4" plywood between the cell and bladder when we ran at Bakersfield in the hot ass summer. Any type of heat resistancent material will work. 

 

If you are running gas with ethenal it is worse. The ethenal has a lower boiling rate from what I've been told. Insulting the bottom of the tank/cell can't hurt.

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@Lethal Cliff interesting you bring this up as I was just talking about this very same thing with some people, but I have no proof/data/baseline to work from either. I was considering altering the regulator location on the Camaro to the rear. It is still a "return" style, but the reg would dump right back into the cell instead of constantly recirc'ing and carrying heat from the engine compartment. The Camaro is just a hot mo fo in general given the way the 4th gens are so shrouded in the engine compartment. Considering other alternatives before redoing the fuel system and needing to retune for a non vacuum controlled f.p. regulator.

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1 hour ago, Lethal Cliff said:

Has anyone ever tracked your fuel temps?  We had some strange fuel tank pressure issues at VIR.  While working on the lift pump during practice i noticed the fuel was rather warm.  I'm going to start monitoring the temp @ the surge tank.  But, until i have a baseline, I'm not quite sure what to look for.

It's interesting. The only two times I've seen people having issues with fuel temps were both at VIR. The one time, several BMW's had the problem including Sri, and they took the hood off of their car to solve it. I was racing with Speed Concepts. I drove into town and got a big cooler, a tarp and ice. We covered the fuel barrels from the sun and started putting the fuel jugs in ice before putting into the car. Anything that could help. 

I wonder what it is about VIR and this issue. 

 

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Yes we suffered from this issue.  After installing what became effective front aero that limited the amount of air moving under the car.  We found that the hot air generated by the exhaust that ran in the stock location was just pooling around the cell and diff.  We measure diff temps above 550 degrees and at NCM last year, the fuel was hot enough that it was vaporizing in the tank and locking the low pressure pump.  Tried running a ducting system that picked up just forward of the diff and pulled air out through the old taillight housings, however in extreme heat, it did not work well enough.  We also cook two cv's in the process.  Solved it by running and IMSA GTD(one of the lexus's found the pic online) style exhaust setup through the passenger seat area of the car and keeping any type of heat out from under the car.

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20 hours ago, pintodave said:

@Lethal Cliff interesting you bring this up as I was just talking about this very same thing with some people, but I have no proof/data/baseline to work from either. I was considering altering the regulator location on the Camaro to the rear. It is still a "return" style, but the reg would dump right back into the cell instead of constantly recirc'ing and carrying heat from the engine compartment. The Camaro is just a hot mo fo in general given the way the 4th gens are so shrouded in the engine compartment. Considering other alternatives before redoing the fuel system and needing to retune for a non vacuum controlled f.p. regulator.

 

I simple solution might be to use a Corvette C5 (needs to be 2000 or newer) fuel filter.  They have a built in regulator and you can mount close to your fuel tank.  I have this set up on my non race car (1950 Ford with LS1).  

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Mounting the regulator to the outlet of the fuel pump and dumping right back to the cell works great, its nice only having a single -6 line to run to the front of the car.

 

pump.thumb.jpg.1ae7452db7c626d5668455e2d0970d7b.jpg

 

Here is how we managed to overheat the fuel in the cell enough to boil and push out the vent tube which resulted in setting the car on fire….

 

 

IMG_20151212_103724.thumb.jpg.45f398fcb977a677eced7ead387259fd.jpg

 

 

 

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We had hot fuel/vapor lock with the turbo setup and fuel cell.  We did some rudimentary testing of the fuel temps and determined the engine bay caused most of the heat soak (not much temp difference between return temp at rail and return temp at cell), but we weren't at a hot race track (it was August and hot outside, but just sitting in my driveway).  Anyway, we're no longer turbo'd, so I haven't put that much more thought into it.  We've done a few things like move the fuel filter away from our exhaust manifold, put the OE shields back on and are sleeving some of the fuel lines, but guess I didn't think the track surface would radiate that much heat.  Guess I'll have to keep an eye on it.

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Living and racing in Texas and Florida we must take deal with high fuel temps regularly. A few things we have learned. Engine bay to fuel cell:

 

1. Use ceramic coated headers or wrap headers with high temperature resistant exhaust wrap.  (If using headers.  Wraps are controversial. Use properly) 

2. Vent engine bay heat as much as the rules allow. 

3. Get exhaust gasses out from under the car as quickly as possible. ( Do not use exhaust dumps. Especially with a low car on asphalt.) It is a blow torch onto the fuel cell and rear end components. 

4. Use Braided steel for ALL fuel lines. Including return. ( it is excellent insulation for fuel.) 

5. Keep fuel out of direct sunlight and off the ground if possible. ( make a small stand or leave the jugs in the wagon or cart used to haul them. We run a small fan at the jugs in midday

heat. We also use 55 gallon plastic fuel drums. It keeps fuel cooler than metal drums. We retrieve it as close to pit stops as possible from the trailer.) 

 

We have not had any fuel temp issues. Maybe we are lucky but  some of these things could help a team. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Cam Benty
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4 hours ago, mhr650 said:

Mounting the regulator to the outlet of the fuel pump and dumping right back to the cell works great, its nice only having a single -6 line to run to the front of the car.

 

Here is how we managed to overheat the fuel in the cell enough to boil and push out the vent tube which resulted in setting the car on fire….

 

Do you run a vacuum reference back to the regulator in the tank?

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16 hours ago, Burningham said:

 

Do you run a vacuum reference back to the regulator in the tank?

 

No. it is a normally aspirated rotary with a MS3Pro engine management system so it is tuned to work with steady 3 bar fuel pressure.

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I added a piece of 1/4" plywood between the cell and bladder by this any type of heat Resistance material will work, I have tried in my ram truck, which i use for Manhattan 24 Hour Towing, and thats working fine, one more suggestion for you, use the ceramic coated headers or wrap headers with high temperature resistant exhaust wrap.

Edited by allen349
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